Nogales, Arizona

Health Care Staff

All of our health care staff volunteer their time—many take a day off from their practice to volunteer at The Clinic. Others are retired and give up a day of retirement activities. Many have been volunteering for a number of years. All are dedicated to providing quality care to our patients despite our often limited resources. Most come every month, but a few specialties are staffed every 3-4 months. By following the links below, you can learn more about each health care department, the staff, and needs of the department.

Audiology
Augmentative/Alternative Communication
• Dermatology
• Nutrition
• Occupational Therapy
• Orthopedics
• Orthotics and Prosthetics
• Pediatrics
• Physical Therapy
• Speech and Language Therapy
• Vision

Please contact St. Andrew’s Children’s Clinic Office if you would like to make a donation:

Phone: (520) 648-3242
E-mail: office@standrewsclinic.org
Location: 75 Calle de las Tiendas, Ste. 129B, Green Valley, AZ

Please send monetary contributions to:
St. Andrew’s Children’s Clinic
PO Box 67
Green Valley, AZ 85622

 

Audiology

Diagnostic testing, to determine if a child has a hearing loss, is done in a sound-proof room in a trailer donated by the Midtown Tucson SERTOMA Club. Some children may benefit from hearing aids or from medical intervention. Families are counseled regarding proper use and care of newly fitted hearing aids, communication options and realistic expectations for their child’s speech-language development. The otolaryngologist removes ear wax, diagnoses tympanic problems and middle ear disorders such as fluid. He recommends prescription filled by family’s medical doctor or Mexican otolaryngologist or refers the patient for a Clinic-provided prescription when available.

When diagnosed with a hearing loss, children are fitted with hearing aids. Patients are seen from birth to age 18 years. Counseling on appropriate use and care of hearing aids is provided with referral to other professionals in The Clinic as needed. Children are seen every 8 months to maintain proper functioning of their hearing aids; this includes cleaning and repairing the devices as well as providing new ear molds and hearing aids when necessary.

Current Staff:

Janis Wolfe Gasch, AuD; Department Head
Julie Peterson, AuD/CCC-A
John Kelly, MD
Kristi Hesse, AuD
Gregory Swigle, AuD
Mary Rose Durkin, AuD
John Cobb, AuD
Rebecca McKinney, AuD
Nick Ramirez, BA


Suggested Donations:


$100-200 to pay for one hearing aid for one child
$50-200 to pay for one hearing aid repair for one child
Used hearing aids
Hearing aid batteries—any size, preferably # 13 and # 675

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Augmentative/Alternative Communication

Augmentative/Alternative Communication focuses on helping those children who, due to the severity or complexity of their communication disorders, need extra help over the long term. These children typically have developmental disabilities which severely limit their ability to speak. Some will achieve the ability to speak in sentences while most will approximate only words or short phrases and some may be unable to say even a single word. Using a combination of speech therapy, picture-based communication boards, and communication devices, we work to maximize each child’s ability to communicate in any way possible. Some will learn to combine spoken language with use of communication devices. Others will point to printed words or images on a touchscreen using a hand or foot, while still others with profound physical disabilities will learn to use a head switch to scan across messages on a tablet computer. Mothers and fathers participate in every therapy session and take activities and strategies home.
We have three Spanish-speaking speech-language pathologists, one from Tucson and two from Nogales, Sonora, who help to ensure that children receive follow-up in their own schools. Our Tucson provider is familiar with a range of communication devices, while the clinicians from Mexico are fluent in Spanish sign language and share this with parents, teachers, and their colleagues from the U.S. Our occupational therapist specializes in evaluation and therapy for children with complex developmental disorders; such as, cerebral palsy; she has worked for years with augmentative communication devices. We are also fortunate to have a dedicated, bilingual future occupational therapist who carries out group activities, and a young father from Sonora who records his voice in our teen boys’ communication devices and helps to set up appointments for follow-up in Tucson.

Current staff:

Sharon Hendrickson-Pfiel, CCC/SLP, Department Head
Erika Ibarra, patóloga de lenguaje
Estela Ibarra, patóloga de lenguaje
Gabe Gibbons, SLPA
Christine Small, OT
Julie Diaz, BS

Suggested Donations:

Used iPad2 and above—your device can be a child’s voice
$150-500 to purchase other devices; such as durable devices with large keys for children with movement problems or little ones starting to communicate
$20-200 to purchase speech software
$30-50 to purchase “kid-proof” cases for iPads; type depends on whether built-in battery-free amplifiers are needed for noisy classrooms
Velcro
AA batteries
Children’s craft supplies

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Dermatology

Dermatology provides the latest medications and technology available for the specialized treatment of all skin diseases and disorders in infants and children. These include alopecia, atopic dermatitis, congenital and acquired nevi/moles, cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita, dermatophytosis, epidermal nevus, epidermylosis bullosa, hemangioma, incontentia pigmenti, lupus, mastocytosis, nail dystrophy and nail disorders, nevus sebaceous, pityriasis rosea, port wine stain, psoriasis, rashes secondary to underlying pathologies and syndromes, scabies, seborrhea, urticaria, vitiligo, xanthogranuloma, and xeroderma pigmentosum.

Current staff:

Vanessa Gildenstern, MD, Department Head

June O'Haver, RN

 

 

Suggested donations:

Vanicream moisturizer/soap
Petroleum jelly
Hydrocortisone 1% ointment
Bacitracin ointment
Sunblock (broad-spectrum, SPF 30 or higher) cream or lotion
Sun hats (child-size)
Sunglasses (children’s)

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Nutrition

The Nutrition Department supports growth and nutrition of children and families who come to The Clinic. Our three dietitians focus on teaching about balanced nutrition. For many of our underweight clients, they support issues of increasing calories. Constipation is a chronic issue that influences children with many disabilities and that is supported by The Clinic as well.
Haberman bottles and nipples are provided for cleft lip/cleft palate babies, and we teach mothers proper use of these bottles. We also teach families how to use feeding tubes for babies who have them.

Current staff:

Co-department Heads:
Jude Trautlein, RD and
Ellen Duperret, RD
Jil Feldhausen, MS, RD

Suggested Donations:

Benefiber, Fibersure or Uni-fiber (non-gelling)
Blenders
Peanut butter
Pediasure (generic okay)
Powdered milk
Prune juice—small cans only
Vitamins, children’s chewable with iron

$310 to buy Haberman bottles for 10 babies
$20 to buy six nipples for Haberman bottles
$36 to buy g-tube bolus extensions for use with blended food

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Occupational Therapy

Pediatric occupational therapists provide information to parents about how to work with children with developmental disabilities, including high activity level, autism, cerebral palsy, seizure disorders, upper extremity weakness, poorly developing grasp and hand skills. Parents want to teach early educational preparation for school. Also addressed are sensory disorders; such as, perceptual problems, usual sensory needs, behavioral challenges, and poor ability to calm and sleep. Upper body strengthening techniques are demonstrated. Suggestions to parents include teaching self-care skills; such as, eating, dressing, toilet training, and tooth brushing. Also included is information about how to address sensory needs; such as, excessive chewing, calming, protection. Hand splints, special eating and self-care items, sensory items, and educational items are distributed. Hard or soft helmets may also be needed.

Current staff:

Christine Merrill, Department Head
Lorinda Fleming, OTR/L

Suggested Donations:

$20-500 for hand splints, adaptive equipment for self-care,
sensory and early teaching, as well as soft or hard helmets
$15 for tactile tiger bracelet for children who use tactile stimulation
as a calming or self-regulation method
$25-50 for chewing items to stimulate food sensation or provide a chewing alternative to chewing on shirts, pencils, etc.
$35 for Soft-crown synthetic leather helmet, size specific to child
$35 for Massage tube
$17 for Vibrating hair brush to provide tactile and somatosensory stimulation
$30 for specialized scissors for children with visual-motor impairments
$10-25 for specially adapted eating bowls and utensils

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Orthopedics

Patients are children with musculoskeletal problems. These include children with manifestations of cerebral palsy and spinal bifida (myelomeningocele); congenital dislocation of the hip and club feet; deformities resulting from trauma, including leg length discrepancies, amputations, and angular deformities of the extremities; curvature of the spine (scoliosis) and other spinal conditions; children with muscle and bone tumors; infection of bone and joints which can cause deformities and painful stiff joints manifested by a limp or a bowed leg; and bone deformities resulting from metabolic diseases. These types of problems are diagnosed and treated through the combined efforts of volunteer orthopedic surgeons.
The Clinic is blessed with having as volunteers a pediatric orthopedic surgeon from Tucson, a retired orthopedic surgeon from Green Valley, and a pediatric orthopedic surgeon who visits The Clinic from Sweden. Pediatric orthopedic surgeons and their staffs from the Shriners Hospitals in Spokane, Washington and Sacramento, California participate in the care of the children seen in the Orthopedic Department on alternate months. When surgical care for a child with an orthopedic problem is recommended, he/she is able to go to one of these Shriners Hospitals for surgical care. For children in need of braces, prostheses, physical therapy, and almost any other need, they are referred to the respective department of St. Andrew’s Children’s Clinic which have volunteers well trained in these specialty areas.

Current staff:

James Hayes, MD, Department Head, orthopedic surgeon
Francisco Valencia, MD, pediatric orthopedic surgeon
Mark Frankel, MD, orthopedic surgeon
Bertyl Romanus, MD pediatric orthopedic surgeon
Glen Baird, MD, pediatric orthopedic surgeon, Shriners Hospital, Spo- kane
Jon Davids, MD, pediatric orthopedic surgeon, Shriners Hospital, Sacra- mento
Joel Lerman, MD, pediatric orthopedic surgeon, Shriners Hospital, Sacra- mento
Michelle James, MD, pediatric orthopedic surgeon specializing in hand and upper extremities, Shriners Hospital, Sacramento
Karen Williams, RN, Care Coordinator, Shriners, Spokane
Francisco OQuendo, LPN, licensed practical nurse, Shriners, Spokane
Alma Martinez, MA, orthopedic assistant, Shriners, Sacramento
Melina McCahon, PA, physician assistant, Shriners, Sacramento
Ary Arauz, PA, physician assistant, Shriners, Sacramento
Imelda Priest, RN, Shriners Hospital, Sacramento

Suggested Donations:

Round-trip transportation for patient and accompanying parent to Shriners Hospital for surgery: $1,000
Laboratory and Imagining Studies (X-ray, MRI, CAT Scan) for one child: $50-2,000

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Orthotics

Patients seen in this department need orthotic (bracing) and prosthetic (artificial limb) devices. Common pathologies of the children include cerebral palsy, spinal bifida, clubfoot, scoliosis, proximal femoral focal deficiency, and traumatic incidents leading to deficiencies of the upper or lower extremities.
Children who have special shoe needs are fitted by our volunteer Board Certified Pedorthist. He and his wife bring an inventory of specialized therapeutic footwear to each clinic. The footwear is fitted to the patients, to aid in leg and foot discrepancies, and extra depth requirements which accommodate the ankle foot orthoses (AFOs) provided by Hanger Clinic. They also add arch supports and full sole lifts to the patients’ shoes when needed.

 Current staff:

Sarah Sumii, CPO, Department Head
Holly Olszewski, CPO
Elizabeth Chabot, CO
Michael Meyers, C.Ped.

Suggested Donations:

Orthosis for one child: $250
Corrective shoes for one child: $100
Prosthesis for one child: $500

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Pediatrics

Pediatric nurses weigh and measure pediatric, cardiology, and nutrition patients. They record measurements and maintain records. Patients seen are from newborn to age 18 years. Medical conditions include cleft palate, cerebral palsy, seizure disorders, and all other conditions. Nursing staff distribute donated umbrella strollers. This helps the mothers who must carry their children, and as the children get older they get very heavy.
For pediatric patients, the nurses take the patients to the area where the doctors are located. The patient’s information is verified, and the computer clerk prints out an intake form for the doctors. The doctor asks questions of the parents, writes prescriptions, and refers the patient to other departments as necessary: to Physical Therapy for equipment or instruction, to Phlebotomy for a blood test, to Nutrition for education, to the Dermatologist or Cardiologist, to Vision or another specialty. Referral might be for an MRI or EEG in Tucson. In addition to pediatricians and family practice doctors, the Department includes two pediatric neurologists who see patients with neurological problems.

Current staff:

María Eugenia Piña, MD, Department Head
Ed Spenny, MD
Karl Friedmann, MD
Guillermo Garcia Quiroz, MD
John Gray, MD
Helen Danahey, MD
Louise Keane, RN
Alverita Egbert, RN
Susan Sergeant, RN
Roberta Harman, RN

Suggested Donations:

Umbrella strollers

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Physical Therapy

Physical therapists work with children who have a variety of neuro-motor disorders including cerebral palsy, spinal bifida, seizure disorders, chromosomal abnormalities, and developmental delays. Utilizing therapeutic exercise techniques, we work to improve the children’s motor functioning in the areas of balance, coordination, movement, and mobility. An important part of our therapy is to train parents in a home therapy program that can be incorporated into their daily routine. Positioning and handling strategies are shared to help maximize the child’s functional abilities. In addition, we help families obtain therapeutic equipment; such as, walkers, therapeutic strollers, and wheel chairs to aid in the child's mobility and home care.

Current staff:

Jill Martindale, PT, Department Head
Nanette Burnett, PT
Annie Dietrich, PT
Emily Gaylord, PT
Barbara Sinclair, PT

Suggested Donations:

Physical therapy (exercise) balls (45 cm & 55 cm)
Physio rolls “Peanut balls” (30 cm & 40 cm)
$1000-1,500 to purchase therapeutic “stroller” chairs
$1000-1,500 for wheel chair adaptations/modifications
$300 to purchase walkers/ambulation devices

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Speech and Language Therapy

The Speech and Language Therapy Department works to improve the articulation and language skills of children who come to The Clinic. The therapists treat children with cleft palate/cleft lip situations and identify which clients need to be put on the surgery list for surgeries conducted at the Annual Cleft Palate/Cleft Lip Mission in Hermosillo each October. These children also tend to have dental needs and middle ear infections so they are referred to a dentist/orthodontist or to an Ear, Nose and Throat Specialist, depending on their needs. Other children have hearing impairments, Down Syndrome, or developmental delays. We partner with the parents during our sessions so they can work with their children at home between visits. Mexican sign language is used with children having hearing impairments.

Current staff:

Roxanna Holguin, MS, CCC/SLP, Department Head
Oscar Rocha, SLT
Manuel A. Rocha, SLT
Elexa Rojas, SLT
Miriam Mabante, SLPA
Zoila Perez,SLPA

 

Suggested Donations:

$500-1,000 for dental/orthodontic work for one child
$1,000 cleft lip/cleft palate surgery for one childX
Simple picture books in Spanish
Spiral notebooks, stickers and pens for children’s
homework assignments
Small mirrors and small toys/prizes for homework rewards

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Vision

Patients include children with severe vision loss or blindness and children whose parents want to be sure of their child’s diagnosis. Patients include those having difficulty seeing the board, textbook, television, etc.
Children are examined by an ophthalmologist or optometrist who provides a prescription for glasses if needed. Our optician works with child and family to select an appropriate frame and takes measurements.
Some children have very complex situations and need to be referred so they are examined in an office or under anesthesia. We have provided prosthetics to children who have lost an eye due to disease or injury.
Volunteers trained in education of children with visual impairments work with children whose vision loss is so severe they need to learn alternative methods for learning. This many include Braille reading/writing and use of adaptive devices for the totally blind. Children with some usable vision may be assisted with devices; such as, special low vision aids or voice output devices. Children who have degenerative diseases are assisted in making transition from using regular print materials to enlarged print and/or Braille. Children may receive Braillewriters and other necessary equipment, all provided free of charge by The Clinic. All children receiving educational services are evaluated to see if they can travel safely and, if necessary, receive a “white cane” and instruction in orientation and mobility.
A volunteer counselor sees children having emotional or behavior difficulties related to severe visual loss. The counselor also works with families struggling with news of no cure for their child’s eye condition.

Current staff:

Lynne Albright, EdD, Department Head and Teacher of the Visually Impaired
Susanne Maya, Licensed Dispensing Optician
Kathleen Allen, PhD, Certified School Psychologist
Chuck Chapman, MEd, Teacher of the Visually Impaired
Bill Hawkins, EdD, Certified Orientations and Mobility Specialist
Lupita Hernandez, MEd, Cross Categorical Special Education, Certified Teacher of the Visually Impaired
Connie Matusoff, MA in Special Education/Orientation and Mobility Specialist
Karen Mulholland, MEd, Teacher of the Visually Impaired
Penny Rosenblum, PhD, Certified Teacher of the Visually Impaired
Sandra Reino, MEd in Early Childhood, Certified Orientation and Mobility
Specialist
Amy L. Davis, OD
Richard Lewis, MD
Carol A. Schulte, OD

Suggested Donations:

$250 for refurbished Braille writer
Used children’s eye glasses

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